[usPropHeader] Error loading user control: The file '/CMSWebParts/WK.HLRP/LNC/LNCProductHeader.ascx' does not exist.

Buy this Article for $7.95

Have a coupon or promotional code? Enter it here:

When you buy this you'll get access to the ePub version, a downloadable PDF, and the ability to print the full article.

Keywords

health risk, hispanic, not overweight, overweight

 

Authors

  1. NIES, MARY A. PhD, RN, FAAN, FAAHB
  2. ARTINIAN, NANCY T. PhD, RN, FAHA
  3. SCHIM, STEPHANIE MYERS PhD, RN, CNAA, APRN,BC
  4. Wal, JILLON S. VANDER PhD
  5. SHERRICK-ESCAMILLA, SHIRLEY MSN, RNC

Abstract

Purpose: This study describes the health risks of urban Hispanic adults and compares the health risks of persons who identified themselves as "not overweight" with those who identified themselves as "overweight."

 

Design: A descriptive correlational design was used to examine current health risks.

 

Setting: The study, a part of a larger community action study, was conducted in the predominantly Hispanic/Latino community of Southwest Detroit. A Roman Catholic parish, a central component of this community, served as the study setting.

 

Sample: One hundred ninety-three Hispanic adults participated.

 

Methods: Following administration of an information sheet, participants were asked to complete the 22-item Personal Health Risk Assessment, available in both English and Spanish versions, which measured health status and demographic characteristics.

 

Findings: Significant differences in blood pressure, diabetes, and the total number of health risks between the "not overweight" and "overweight" groups were identified, with the "overweight" participants scoring higher on these subscales.

 

Conclusions: Findings from this study highlight the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors and the greater clustering of cardiovascular risk factors among persons identifying themselves as overweight.

 

Implications for Practice: This study supports the need for active participation of clinical nurse specialists in health-promotion activities and intervention research in this growing population.