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Authors

  1. Butler, Katharine G. PhD, Journal Editor, TLD

Article Content

The speech of man is like embroidered tapestries[horizontal ellipsis]Since like this too has to be expanded in order to display its patterns[horizontal ellipsis]

 

-Themistocles (circa 528-462)

 

The previous issue of Topics in Language Disorders (TLD), entitled Language and Augmentative Communication and coedited by C. Higdon and L. Higdon, addressed, among other things, the use of evidence-based practice (EBP) as necessary for treatment efficacy in clinical practice by speech-language-pathologists (SLPs). While acknowledging that EPB may be essential, practitioners are faced with the new 3 Rs: Requirements, Regulations, and Restrictions at any number of levels as local, state, and national directives multiply.

 

TLD 24:2 addresses, as the cover suggests, group treatment as a worthy treatment across a number of disorders, while noting that it is an underutilized intervention that brings into play a necessary interaction at the social/pragmatic level between the clinician and the patients.

 

Coeditors Kimbarow and Avent have gathered together authors with years of successful experience. Readers will recognize the importance and value of patient/clinician interactions that are carefully crafted, not necessarily left to improvisation and the inspiration of the moment.

 

Many clinicians, particularly in school-based programs, have had previous experience with group therapy as reflected in attendance at state and national conventions in our discipline when the words "Practical Applications will be addressed" may be found in the description. Clinicians with long memories may recall the era of the "Great Clinicians" so named for their abilities in dealing successfully with difficult disorders and their willingness to model treatment before their peers and other attendees at national or state conventions. Of particular interest were those presenters whose clinical expertise was in one of the disorders under intensive study and dispute. These lively sessions centered on aphasia, stuttering, articulation, cleft palate, or cerebral palsy, not necessarily in that order. The menu varied over the years, as did the speakers. As Graham (this issue) indicates, there remains a need to provide practitioners with continuing information regarding group processes, called support, counseling, or educational speech activities, which is essential for those who are recovering from a laryngectomy, permitting attention to the client's psychosocial needs.

 

For readers who wish to explore a variety of approaches, many suggested for children or adolescents in inclusion classrooms are available, including Briton and Fujiki (2004), Donahue and Foster (2004), Kagan et al. (2004), Nelson and Hoskins (1997), Stone (2004), Van Riper and Butler (1955), Westby (2004), and Ylvisaker, Feeney, and Feeney (1999).

 

The issue editors have taken Themistocles at his word and have shown a light on the patterns of speech, the embroidered tapestries, that may evolve when group treatment is carefully planned, enhancing and supporting language recovery. I trust that readers will agree!

 

REFERENCES

 

Brinton, B., & Fujiki, M. (2004). Social and affective factors in children with language impairment: Implications for literacy learning. In K. Apel, B. Ehren, R. Silliman, & A. Stone, (Eds.), Handbook of Language and Literacy Development and Disorders. New York: Guilford Press. [Context Link]

 

Donahue, M. L., & Foster, S. K. (2004). Social cognition, conversation and reading comprehension: How to read a comedy of manners. In K. Apel, B. Ehren, E. Silliman, & A. Stone, (Eds.), Handbook of Language and Literacy Development and Disorders. New York: Guilford Press. [Context Link]

 

Kagan, A., Winckel, J., Black, S., Duchan, J. F., Simmons-Mackie, N., & Square, P. (2004). A set of observational measures for rating support and participation in conversation between adults with aphasia and their conversational partners. Topics in Stroke Rehabilitation, 11(1), 67-83. [Context Link]

 

Nelson, N. W., & Hoskins, B. (Eds.). (1997). Strategies for Supporting Classroom Success: Focus on Communication. San Diego, CA: Singular Publishing Group. [Context Link]

 

Stone, E. (2004). Contemporary approaches to the study of language and literacy development: A call for integration of perspectives. In K. Apel, B. Ehren, E. Silliman, & A. Stone, (Eds.), Handbook of Language and Literacy Development and Disorders. New York: Guilford Press. [Context Link]

 

Themistocles. (528-462 B.C.). Plutarch lives. In Bartlett's familiar quotations (16th ed., p. 62, Sec. 2, ibid 29). Boston: Little, Brown and Company. [Context Link]

 

Van Riper & Butler, K. G. (1995). Speech in the Elementary Classroom. New York: Harper & Brothers. [Context Link]

 

Westby, C. (2004). A language perspective in executive functional, functioning, metacognition, and self-regulation in reading. In K. Apel, B. Ehren, E. Silliman, & A. Stone, (Eds.), Handbook of Language and Literacy Development and Disorders. New York: Guilford Press. [Context Link]

 

Ylvisaker, M., Feeney, J., & Feeney, T. J. (1999). An everday approach to long-term rehabilitation after traumatic brain injury. Clinical Practice Management for Speech Language Pathologists (pp. 117-161). Gaithisburg, MD: Aspen. [Context Link]