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INSTRUCTIONS FOR EARNING CONTINUING EDUCATION CREDIT FROM ASHA

  
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This course is offered for 7.0 ASHA CEUs (Various Levels, Professional Area).

 

To participate in this entire continuing education activity, subscribers to the journal pay a nominal processing fee of $12.00. Nonsubscribers pay an enrollment and processing fee of $50.00. These fees are for the processing of tests and CE certificates and do not represent income to ASHA.

 

A test answer sheet, course evaluation form, and registration form are printed in the back of each issue. To enroll, you should send the completed forms, a check made payable to Lippincott Williams & Wilkins or credit card information for your processing fee, and your completed test to Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. Once processed, LWW will mail verification of your enrollment and a report of your score to you. The graded test answer sheet is not returned, so you may wish to make a copy of your answers before submitting your tests for grading. A score of 80% is the minimum score required to receive CEUs.

 

Allow 4-6 weeks for LWW to process your enrollment fee, grade your test, and send verification of test scores to you. If you must complete CEUs by a licensing renewal deadline you should submit your tests to LWW 4-6 weeks in advance of your deadline. Please send registration forms, fees, tests, and correspondence regarding this continuing education activity to: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, CE Group, 74 Brick Blvd., Bldg. 4, Suite 206, Brick, NJ 08723. For questions about this test, please call 1-800-787-8985.

 

The continuing education tests in Topics in Language Disorders are available to complete online via: http://alliedhealth.ceconnection.com/browse/professions. At this website, readers can find all Wolters Kluwer CE activities available for Speech-Language Pathologists.

 

NEW - Online CEUs for individual articles in this issue

 

Starting with the July - Sept. 2016 issue, all articles in each issue of the journal will be available individually for CEU credit, online only. TLD subscribers receive a discounted price for all CE, both in print and online.

 

An annual ASHA CE Registry fee is required to register ASHA CEUs. ASHA CE Registry fees are paid by the participant directly to the ASHA National Office. The ASHA CE Registry fee allows registration to an unlimited number of ASHA CEUs for a calendar year. Contact the ASHA staff at 800-498-2071 ext. 4219 for CE Registry fee subscription information.

 

IMPORTANT: Whether in print or online, tests for this issue (Volume 37, Issue 1), need to be received by August 31, 2019. LWW prepares and submits a quarterly report to ASHA concerning all participant activity.

 

Continuing Education Questions

The following questions make up the test items for participants for this activity. They are based on the articles presented in this issue of Topics in Language Disorders. The answer sheet is at the end of the issue. Please read the important note on the course evaluation form.

 

Purpose: To provide a guide to the recent developments in removing barriers and implementing facilitators to support the inclusion of adults with aphasia in the community.

 

I. Internet Use in Aphasia: A Case Study Viewed Through the International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health

 

1. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health (ICF) is a useful framework for considering Internet use in aphasia because it

 

a. is helpful in considering activity and participation in relation to Internet activities, and it highlights the importance of factors within the environment and those that are personal to an individual.

 

b. provides useful guidance on assessment measures of Internet skills for people with aphasia.

 

c. provides clinicians with a framework to view how aphasia could impact on linguistic aspects of Internet use.

 

2. The people with aphasia who are the main focus of this article

 

a. have never used the Internet.

 

b. have good Internet skills.

 

c. used the Internet prior to the onset of aphasia.

 

3. The five types of Internet skills discussed in the article are

 

a. operational, functional, information, tactical, and linguistic.

 

b. operational, formal, information, strategic, and linguistic.

 

c. functional, practical, information, strategic, and literacy.

 

4. Bill's Internet skills were assessed by

 

a. a video-recorded formal assessment of Internet skills designed for people with aphasia that involved Bill carrying out a series of increasingly complex tasks.

 

b. a questionnaire completed by his wife and his speech-language therapists.

 

c. using a piece of software monitoring his use of the Internet.

 

5. Which of the following environmental factors was an important consideration for Bill?

 

a. his old and outdated computer

 

b. his children who were unable to provide any support

 

c. his wife Violet who had poor confidence in her own Internet abilities

 

 

II. Optimizing the Experience of Flow for Adults With Aphasia: A Focus on Environmental Factors

 

6. A characteristic of a flow experience is that

 

a. there is a high financial cost.

 

b. time passes differently.

 

c. there is no challenge.

 

7. Csikszentmihalyi's description of flow relative to skill and challenge is

 

a. high skill, low challenge.

 

b. low skill, low challenge.

 

c. high skill, high challenge.

 

8. Flow experiences might support skill development because

 

a. the positive and rewarding characteristics of flow may support repetition and return to those skill-building tasks in which flow was experienced.

 

b. flow experiences require expert skill in order to achieve flow.

 

c. flow occurs only in situations where heavy amounts of physical skill are needed.

 

9. An accurate description of how people with aphasia experience flow is that they

 

a. do not experience flow.

 

b. cannot experience flow.

 

c. can experience flow.

 

10. One factor that may be both a barrier and a facilitator to flow experiences is

 

a. gender.

 

b. task characteristics.

 

c. geographic location.

 

 

III. Found Opportunities for Social Participation: Facilitating Inclusion of Adults With Aphasia

 

11. An example of a created opportunity involving a person with aphasia interacting with others is a

 

a. professional language interpreter supporting a woman with aphasia to participate as a member of a church committee.

 

b. woman with aphasia participating in a wood-working group with the support of a volunteer who has received communication partner training from a speech-language pathologist.

 

c. woman with aphasia visiting with a friend after texting her by telephone to arrange the meeting.

 

12. An example of a found opportunity involving a person with aphasia interacting with others without doing a specific activity with them is a

 

a. speech-language pathologist training a community volunteer to become a conversation partner for a man with aphasia.

 

b. woman with aphasia participating in a floral arranging class with the support of a communication support team member who has received communication partner training from a speech-language pathologist.

 

c. man with aphasia volunteering at a local food bank with the support of a communication support team member who has received communication partner training from a speech-language pathologist.

 

13. Found opportunities involving a person with aphasia interacting with others during activities in which there is a common goal include all of the followingexcept

 

a. a man with aphasia participating in an art class with the support of a volunteer who has received communication partner training from a speech-language pathologist.

 

b. a speech-language pathologist working on impairment-based language skills in therapy with a man with aphasia.

 

c. a woman with aphasia participating in a drama group with the support of a communication support team member who has received communication partner training from a speech-language pathologist.

 

14. An example of a found opportunity involving a person with aphasia interacting with others to make a contribution to society is a

 

a. woman with aphasia participating in an aphasia-friendly yoga class at an aphasia camp.

 

b. professional language interpreter supporting a man with aphasia in his participation in a photography class.

 

c. man with aphasia working with the national aphasia association to develop more aphasia-friendly public transportation services.

 

15. An example of a found opportunity involving a person with aphasia interacting with others to help a specific person or group of people is a

 

a. woman with aphasia participating in a local quilting group with the support of a communication support team member who has received communication partner training from a speech-language pathologist.

 

b. man with chronic aphasia volunteering to help other people with aphasia in the inpatient rehabilitation setting with the support of his speech-language pathologist.

 

c. speech-language pathologist training a friend to become a more effective conversation partner for a person with aphasia.

 

 

IV. Developing Communication Access Standards to Maximize Community Inclusion for People With Communication Support Needs

 

16. People who might benefit from communication access are people who

 

a. can talk.

 

b. have communication support needs.

 

c. have mobility limitations.

 

17. The formal definition of communication access focuses on providing access

 

a. to people who use augmentative and alternative communication.

 

b. through staff who are skilled communicators and who use a range of communication strategies and resources.

 

c. through staff who have positive attitudes, are skilled communicators, and who use a range of communication strategies and resources.

 

18. The most highly rated barrier resulting in negative experiences for people with communication support needs was the

 

a. lack of personal experience interaction with people with communication support needs.

 

b. fear by others toward people with communication support needs.

 

c. inability of community members to understand the message.

 

19. The purpose of communication access assessment is to

 

a. verify that minimum standards have been met.

 

b. identify the problems.

 

c. identify the solutions.

 

20. The phases to become communication accessible are

 

a. engagement, training, assessment, and review.

 

b. preparation, training, assessment, and review.

 

c. engagement, preparation, assessment, and review.

 

 

V. Facilitating the Involvement of People With Aphasia in Stroke Research by Developing Communicatively Accessible Research Resources

 

21. The design characteristics that people with aphasia prefer in written information are

 

a. digits, 14-point font, Verdana font, and 1.5-line spacing.

 

b. digits, 14-point font, Times Roman font, and double-spacing.

 

c. digits, 16-point font, Verdana font, and double-spacing.

 

22. Previous research has found that people with aphasia

 

a. prefer the use of illustrations and also read statistically significantly faster when using them.

 

b. prefer black and white line drawings and do not read any faster when using illustrations.

 

c. prefer illustrations as an aid to understanding but do not read statistically significantly faster when using them.

 

23. The six-stage project outlined in this article included the important stage of

 

a. establishing a user group of people with aphasia.

 

b. establishing a user group of speech-language therapists.

 

c. extensive consultation to repurpose existing images.

 

24. Graphics are considered helpful for comprehension because they

 

a. substitute meaning for written words.

 

b. help orient the reader to the topic.

 

c. are more visually acceptable than written words.

 

25. In addition to the resources, guidance was produced for researchers and included

 

a. an explanation of aphasia, ideas on how to have better conversations with someone with aphasia, and the cost implications of including people with aphasia in research.

 

b. an explanation of aphasia, ideas on how to support cognitive impairments, and how to help someone express him- or herself.

 

c. ideas on how to have better conversations, the impact of cognition on reading, and how to help someone with aphasia understand.

 

 

VI. The Consequences of the Consequences: The Impact of the Environment on People With Aphasia Over Time

 

26. The International Classification of Functioning, Disability, and Health provides a conceptual framework to describe a person's

 

a. current level of disease.

 

b. future level of functioning and disability.

 

c. current level of functioning and disability.

 

27. The Social Determinant of Health (SDH) model proposes that

 

a. only social factors influence health and well-being.

 

b. social and biological factors influence health and well-being.

 

c. no factors influence health and well-being.

 

28. In the United States, compared with men with university degrees, men with low education live

 

a. 6.5 years less.

 

b. 4.5 years less.

 

c. 2.5 years less.

 

29. Differences in population health that are avoidable are called health

 

a. inequalities.

 

b. disparities.

 

c. inequities.

 

30. The SDH model proposes that the determinants of health include both the

 

a. structural and intermediary.

 

b. systematic and intermediary.

 

c. systematic and structural.

 

  

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