[usPropHeader] Error loading user control: The file '/CMSWebParts/WK.HLRP/LNC/LNCProductHeader.ascx' does not exist.

Article Content

Study Predicts Health Warning Labels on Sugar-Sweetened Beverages Would Decrease Likelihood of Parents Purchasing Them for Their Kids

Parents who participated in an online survey were 20% points less likely to say they would choose a sugar-sweetened beverage for their kids if they viewed a health warning label on its packaging than those who did not view a warning label, according to a study published by Pediatrics. Forty percent of participating parents said they would choose a sugar-sweetened beverage for their kids after viewing a warning label, compared to 60% of participating parents who saw no label. The study, which was funded by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation through its Healthy Eating Research program, also concluded that health warning labels may reduce parents' perception of the healthfulness of sugar-sweetened beverages and the ability of these beverages to boost kids' energy and focus. Additionally, the labels may increase parents' understanding of their child's risk of weight gain, heart disease, and diabetes from consuming these drinks. The study, among the first to examine the influence of sugar-sweetened beverage warning labels, tested the effects, via an online survey of 2,381 parents, of five different labels-one which displayed calorie content and four which displayed variations of warning text-in addition to a control group who saw no warning label.

  
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

Experiences With Healthcare Providers During Nonemergency Care Among Adults With Multiple Chronic Conditions, U.S. Civilian Noninstitutionalized Population, 2012

Studies show that effective communication between providers and patients relates to better satisfaction and outcomes. Persons with multiple chronic conditions are a large and growing segment of the U.S. population. For these patients, provision of care is complex and communication with providers is especially critical. Based on data from the 2012 MEPS-HC, this Statistical Brief presents estimates of perceived quality of healthcare provider communication during nonemergency appointments among adults who were treated for multiple chronic conditions.

  
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

* Almost two thirds of adults with multiple chronic conditions reported that their providers always listened carefully to them during their nonemergency appointments. A similar proportion also felt their providers always showed respect for what they had to say.

 

* Slightly less than half of uninsured adults with multiple chronic conditions reported that their providers always explained things to them in a way that it was easy to understand.

 

* Adults with multiple chronic conditions who were poor were less likely to report that their providers always showed respect for what they had to say than adults with multiple chronic conditions in all other income groups.

 

 

AHRQ Study: Hypertension Is Not Diagnosed or Treated Half the Time

In an AHRQ-funded study, about half of patients with diabetes remained undiagnosed and untreated for hypertension even when their blood pressure rate was recorded at a high level. The retrospective study was based on the electronic health records of more than 770 adult patients at a large Midwestern group practice from 2008 to 2011. The study used two blood pressure measurement levels, 130/80 mmHg and 140/90 mmHg, to identify cases of hypertension; normal blood pressure is considered a rate of less than 120/80 mmHg. For patients meeting the 130/80 mmHg level, only 41% received a diagnosis for hypertension and 37% received medication. Even at the higher 140/90 mmHg level, only 52% of patients received a diagnosis and 49% received medication. Future interventions should target patients with multiple comorbidities to improve hypertension and diabetes care, the study concluded. "Diagnosis and Treatment of Incident Hypertension Among Patients with Diabetes: A U.S. Multi-Disciplinary Group Practice Observational Study" and abstract appeared in the June 2015 issue of the Journal of General Internal Medicine.

  
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

AHRQ's "Questions Are the Answer" Offers Tools To Promote Patient Involvement

"Questions Are the Answer," AHRQ's ongoing public education initiative to involve patients and their families as part of their healthcare team, offers several consumer tools to improve communication between patients and clinicians to help make healthcare safer.

  
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.

AHRQ's Web site features these valuable tools:

 

* Videos of patients and clinicians discussing the importance of asking questions and sharing information.

 

* A brochure, titled "Be More Involved in Your Health Care: Tips for Patients," that offers helpful suggestions to follow before, during, and after a medical visit.

 

* Notepads to help patients prioritize the top three questions they wish to ask during their medical appointment.

 

 

"Questions Are the Answer" is designed to promote safer care and better health outcomes. To request a free supply of these materials in English or Spanish, email mailto:AHRQpubs@ahrq.hhs.gov or call 1-800-358-9295.

 

New Action Planning Tool Available for AHRQ Safety Culture Surveys

A new Action Planning Tool for AHRQ Surveys on Patient Safety Culture is now available. After assessing patient safety culture, organizations may use the planning tool to determine steps needed for improvements. The resource provides step-by-step guidance to develop an action plan to improve patient safety culture. Organizations may find it useful, for example, to brainstorm the potential barriers to implementing initiatives, as well as strategies to overcome them. The Action Plan Template is designed to record the goals, initiatives, resources needed, process and outcome measures, and timelines. For questions, email mailto:SafetyCultureSurveys@westat.com or call 1-888-324-9749.

  
Figure. No caption a... - Click to enlarge in new windowFigure. No caption available.