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Authors

  1. Weinrich, Sally PhD, RN, FAAN
  2. Royal, Charmaine PhD
  3. Pettaway, Curtis A. MD
  4. Dunston, Georgia PhD
  5. Faison-Smith, Louise AD
  6. Priest, Julie Hudson MSPH
  7. Roberson-Smith, Pamela AS
  8. Frost, Jacqueline DMS
  9. Jenkins, Jean PhD, RN, FAAN
  10. Brooks, Karen Albiez MS, CGC
  11. Powell, Isaac MD

Abstract

Six regions for prostate cancer genes have been identified, and it is anticipated that prostate cancer susceptibility testing will be available in the future. This correlational study identified predictors for interest in prostate cancer susceptibility testing among African American men. Participants were 320 African American men from the African American Hereditary Prostate Cancer Study and the South Carolina Prostate Cancer Education and Screening Study participated. Two questions measured interest in genetic prostate cancer susceptibility testing and family history of prostate cancer. Chi-square analyses by family history as well as demographics (age, education, marital status) were performed.

 

Most of the men (277 [87%]) indicated an interest in genetic prostate cancer susceptibility testing. Interest in undergoing testing did not vary by family history, age, or education. Marital status was the only significant demographic predictor. Men who were married were significantly more likely to respond with a "yes" to interest in prostate cancer susceptibility testing than were men who were not married. The high "yes" response rate and the men's confusion between the genetic prostate cancer susceptibility testing and prostate cancer screening highlight the need for public education once prostate cancer genes are identified and available for public testing.