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Use these resources to give patients with peripheral arterial disease (PAD) information and support.

 

American Heart Association

http://tinyurl.com/ma54qqr

 

Information on this website is written in lay terms and outlines the disease in a way patients will understand. Look for sections about the disease process, signs and symptoms, diagnostic criteria, and treatment options. Also available is a printable PAD information sheet that patients can use as a reference when speaking with their primary care provider.

 

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

http://tinyurl.com/kycoox7

 

The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute and the P.A.D. Coalition are sponsoring a campaign called Stay in Circulation: Take Steps to Learn About P.A.D. Patient education materials on the website include fact sheets, wallet cards, and videos; national and local media outreach; and community events. The campaign's goal is to raise awareness about PAD among both patients and healthcare professionals.

 

P.A.D. Coalition

http://www.vasculardisease.org

 

An alliance of leading health organizations, government agencies, and vascular health professional societies, the P.A.D. Coalition offers educational materials and up-to-date information about PAD. Visitors to the site can download PDFs of lifesaving tips, find vascular specialists, and keep up with the latest news on diagnosis and treatment.

 

Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions

http://tinyurl.com/mdcdaku

 

SecondsCount, a website sponsored by the Society for Cardiovascular Angiography and Interventions, offers readers details about recognizing PAD, treatment options, and questions to ask healthcare providers if PAD is suspected or diagnosed. A printable "Are you at Risk?" flow chart can help patients determine their risk of PAD, and a Take Control Planner encourages them to set simple goals to prevent or control the disease. Another great resource is the SecondsCount Walking Guide, which helps patients start a walking regimen that may let them walk farther with less pain.